Day of the Dead in Photos, 2017

It’s the middle of the first week of November, which means that the Day of the Dead has come and gone. The holiday is one of the most interesting and colorful in Mexico, taking place in big processions on the street, in people’s homes, and in cemeteries across the country. Please read a more detailed description here.

Not having too much time to write, I uploaded a bunch of photos to this blog’s Facebook page. Please click here to take a look.

Or, look to the right to find the little Facebook box. Besides the photos for Day of the Dead, I have other collections from my travels in Mexico. Click “like,” and when I post links to articles about Mexico or more photos, they will appear in your feed.

And while you’re looking to the right of this page, check out the blog stats. As I write this, I’m a couple thousand short of one million hits. One million hits! I remember when I passed ten thousand a few years ago, and how I couldn’t believe it was that many.

So, thank you very much for visiting my blog. I’ll be writing longer articles soon, but for now please enjoy a few of my photos from the Day of the Dead:



The Day of the Dead in Mexico: What’s it all about?

No Hay Bronca

In Mexico, a country full of color, tradition and flavor, the Day of the Dead stands out as especially colorful, traditional and flavorful. Rooted in Pre-Hispanic practice and caught up in the trick-or-treat influence of Halloween, the holiday is a chance to honor deceased relatives with an altar in the home, dress up as an elegant skeleton, and sample the best of Mexico’s artesanal candy.

The Day of the Dead takes place on November 2, but it’s celebrated several days or even several weeks before, especially when there’s a long weekend like this year. While it’s one of the most public holidays in Mexico, in many ways it’s also the most personal. Besides costumes and outdoor events (more on those below), perhaps the most interesting part of the holiday is that people visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried.

They clean it up, adorn it with flowers, and even may spend…

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Fiestas Patrias: September 15-16 Independence Parties in Mexico

No Hay Bronca

On September 16, 1810, the Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla rang the bells of his church in Dolores, Guanajuato. A crowd of locals gathered around him on the front steps, and Hidalgo gave a passionate speech about the need for an independent Mexico, though today the exact words aren’t known.

Today, there are fiestas everywhere in Mexico to commemorate this symbolic beginning of the Mexican War of Independence against Spain. The end of the war finally came 11 long years later in 1821.

Hidalgo’s grito (cry, shout) is reenacted throughout Mexico on September 15, the night before the holiday, usually at 11 p.m. The most important available government official rings the bell that hangs from the front of the government palace in nearly every city and town. People fill the zocalo, the center square fronted by government buildings and the cathedral. They dance to live music, waiting for…

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