Teaching English Abroad

I’ve been an English teacher for 10 years now. In 2002, about a month after I graduated university I went to South Korea, where I taught English to children for two years. My next city was Vancouver, Canada. For five years I worked at several schools, mostly teaching people in their twenties but really anyone from 3 to 63. They were from all over the world: Koreans, Japanese, Taiwanese, Chinese, Mexicans, Colombians, Brazilians, Saudi Arabians, and all kinds of Europeans. Some became good friends. Also in Vancouver I began writing original teaching material and designing courses, especially for writing, speaking, and pronunciation.

In 2010 I moved here to Mexico. My career has continued to evolve; I work at two schools, a language school and a major university. In the university I develop and teach my own original classes.

None of my work is full time down here, so among other things I travel to factories to teach businessmen and do editing work. Also, now I am a professional translator for the local university, doing legal documents, medical studies, and plenty of transcripts and certificates.

Most of the content on this blog is about Mexico, but I realize that many people might be looking for information on how to teach English abroad. The job is quite challenging but at the same time rewarding, both for the ability to travel the world but also for the time you spend in the classroom. Working with people is wonderful. I teach them English, but they teach me everything.

My Kindergarten Class in Korea

There’s a lot to consider if you want to be an ESL teacher. I can’t write it all in one post. Maybe I’ll write a book someday. For now I’ll collect some posts on this page that deal with specific aspects of the job. Some things to consider: certifications, experience and how to get it, the job search, what to look for in a contract, the visa process, what it’s like living abroad, and teaching methods – how you spend your time in the classroom.

Please ask me any specific question you may have by leaving a comment. Although I’ve only worked in three countries, I have friends from all over the world, including other English teachers.

class

The short story is that there is a lot more to being an ESL teacher than just teaching. It’s more than a job, but a lifestyle, and to what extent is totally up to you. And really, anyone can do it.

Here are few posts that I hope will be useful to you:

3 Things to Know about Being an International English Teacher (read this first)

How to Teach English as a Second or Foreign Language – this focuses on teaching methods.

How to Work Legally in Mexico – even if you don’t want to work in Mexico, this will give you an idea of the official process you will be up against, regardless of country.

ESL Teaching in Mexico as a Freelancer – my story of how I ended up here.

Here are some articles I write on teaching techniques for ESL-Lounge:

Circle Time

ESL – Subject or Communication Tool?

Using Music in the Classroom

If you want to know the specifics of working in Mexico as a teacher, you can read this series of blogs I wrote for a TESL school. Some things to consider: certifications, experience and how to get it, the job search, what to look for in a contract, the visa process, what it’s like living abroad, and teaching methods – how you spend your time in the classroom.

I’ll try to give a nice overview of those points in future posts. Thanks for reading!

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About Ted Campbell

U.S.-Canadian writer, translator and university teacher in Mexico. Travel stories and practical tips on my blog No Hay Bronca: nohaybronca.wordpress.com Twitter: @NoHayBroncaBlog // Contact: nohaybroncablog (at) gmail.com

Posted on March 31, 2012, in Teaching ESL, Working in Mexico and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Thanks for this post!!

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